Category Archives: e-book

New E-Book Release!

 

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Thirteen year-old David has quit soccer—he much prefers solving Sudoku puzzles. But when his parents divorce, David must endure the indignity of reporting to Miss Lee, the elderly Chinese-American neighbor Mom enlists to keep tabs on him.

David resents the intrusion, but when he and Miss Lee discover a common interest in word games, a true friendship develops. In fact, Miss Lee understands David better than Dad, who pressures David to participate in sports and insists he complete a project required for application to a prestigious private school. When Dad learns of his friendship with Miss Lee, his prejudiced nature shows itself. But does David care enough about what Dad wants for him to abandon a good friend?

As Miss Lee begins to help David with his application project, she wonders what consequences this will have for David. How will Miss Lee straddle the fine line between mentor, and meddler?

 

Available now for $.99 through Amazon, Kobo, Scribd, iBooks, Page Foundry, Tolino, and 24 Symbols.

 

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Filed under e-book

New E-Book Release!

 

the-fanboy-who-fled-cover

Thirteen year-old David has quit soccer—he much prefers solving Sudoku puzzles. But when his parents divorce, David must endure the indignity of reporting to Miss Lee, the elderly Chinese-American neighbor Mom enlists to keep tabs on him.

David resents the intrusion, but when he and Miss Lee discover a common interest in word games, a true friendship develops. In fact, Miss Lee understands David better than Dad, who pressures David to participate in sports and insists he complete a project required for application to a prestigious private school. When Dad learns of his friendship with Miss Lee, his prejudiced nature shows itself. But does David care enough about what Dad wants for him to abandon a good friend?

As Miss Lee begins to help David with his application project, she wonders what consequences this will have for David. How will Miss Lee straddle the fine line between mentor, and meddler?

 

Available now for $.99 through Amazon, Kobo, Scribd, iBooks, Page Foundry, Tolino, and 24 Symbols.

 

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Writing Fiction for Foodies (repost)

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I have a love-hate relationship with cooking. The responsibility of putting something not only edible but healthy on the table wars with my longing to put up my feet at day’s end. But the sense of accomplishment I savor when dishing up a casserole made from unprocessed ingredients seems rare and beautiful–an achievement only outshined by giving birth to my daughters. Perhaps these periodic Martha Stewart impulses stimulate the same endorphins as finishing a Jillian Anderson work-out. No doubt such research would be easier if I actually completed both tasks the same day. Someone should really write a grant for this.

While I’m prone to rhapsodizing about food, I haven’t yet decided whether I am a “foodie.” No doubt a Buzzfeed quiz would be happy to impose their assessment on me, but I prefer self-evaluation. I finally settled on these standards of measure:

1) Preoccupation with exotic ingredients (saffron-infused oil? organic double matcha?) only available at a store at least thirty minutes from one’s home. Extra points if the store doesn’t sell Spam or cigarettes.

2) Possession of a sufficiently large cookbook collection to qualify one for a TV spot on “Hoarders” or similar. (and an equally colossal array of online recipes)

3) A marked preference for novels in which the main character’s favorite recipes are featured. Extra credit if recipes are listed at the back of the book. (or if the main character is a caterer)

4) Willingness and/or compulsion to make homemade (and probably organic) versions of common kitchen staples, such as ketchup or peanut butter.

And finally:

5) Frequent snapping of food selfies while fantasizing about becoming a restaurant critic. (being paid to eat–Lord have mercy!)

A score of two indicates developing foodie tendencies. Three or more positive responses correlate strongly with foodie-ness. Implications of scores of four and five should be obvious. My score fluctuates between two and a half and four, depending the amount of time until Christmas is due to arrive. No, I can’t explain the two and a half.

As I sat polishing my book The Reluctant Archivist, I noticed foodie-ness creeping in. Interesting food sightings pepper the narrative, which I’m now confident will enhance the plot. In fact, I think it’s time to embrace the food plot device–maybe even feature a recipe or two. Even if Mill Fairbairn, main character and earnest politician, is far from a chef.

Do you read about food? What does it mean to you?

Quench your thirst for meaning–read.

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You Might be Drawn to my Book If: A Quiz

 

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Would you enjoy “The Reluctant Archivist?” Take the quiz and find out!’      

1. Seeing the phrases “mental illness,” “politics,” and “mystery” together makes you feel:  a) nothing in particular  b) intrigued  c) somewhat repelled.

2.  You would rather read:   a) a book set in the here and now     b) a book set in medieval  times      c) a book set in the 1970’s

3.  To read a book to its end, you need:   a) over a dozen quirky characters   b) the possibility that the main characters find no meaning in their experience         c) a main character who realizes his purpose

4.  Your usual attitude toward the Midwestern U.S. is:    a)  it’s a down-to-earth place   b)  seems kinda boring to me        c) never been there and don’t care to go

5. You think the main character should usually:   a) show flaws but also great resilience    b) never waver and be strong as iron     c) have the most weaknesses and limitations  of any character

6.  Your ideal fiction book has:  a) steamy romance and innuendo       b) mystery elements and twists       c) new technological gadgets

Chose most of these? 

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* 1970’s setting

* intrigued by mental illness, politics, and mystery

* main character who finds his purpose

* the Midwest is a down-to-earth place

* flawed but resilient main character

* twists and mystery

You’ll enjoy “The Reluctant Archivist.” 

 

 

 

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Filed under activism, e-book, historical fiction, mental illness, politics, Uncategorized

Hello, My Name is Ambivalent

Ambivalence in real life is a pain. 1747917718_7d941b5441_zBut my ambivalent book character, Mill, may pique your interest.  Just read the synopsis:

Ever since his participation in high school debate team, Milliard (“Mill”) Fairbairn has known he wanted to pursue a career in local politics. Becoming the mayor of Champaign IL has now become The Goal in his life.

As Mill’s coalition and campaign gathers steam, his older brother Gary, always less ambitious but equally intelligent, plunges into a traumatic future from which even his resourceful brother can’t extricate him.

Mill, ever-supportive, is relieved when Gary achieves some stability, but it is quickly threatened by Mill’s conniving political rivals, who will use any opening to discredit Mill. One night their efforts even threaten Gary’s life and home.5879429534_90b400b642_z

As Gary loses emotional ground, Mill’s own vulnerability to stress becomes more and more apparent. Not willing to entirely give up The Goal, Mill’s distraction and self-sabotage nevertheless nearly derails his plans forever. In the end, however, a change of direction provides the very information necessary to get back on track and achieve what Mill could never have accomplished at home in Champaign.

I’ve been preparing to publish my book, “The Reluctant Archivist” for several years now. I’ve revised the heck out of it. It needs to either be published, or perish.

Shall I send it out to fifty agents, hoping one will like my synopsis enough to consider promoting me to a publisher? Or do I pay a publisher to publish and help me promote my book?

Since you’re not my mother, my publishing angst probably won’t move you. But leave a comment if my synopsis does!

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Filed under character sketch, e-book, historical fiction, mental illness, politics

Writing Fiction for Foodies

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I have a love-hate relationship with cooking. The responsibility of putting something not only edible but healthy on the table wars with my longing to put up my feet at day’s end. But the sense of accomplishment I savor when dishing up a casserole made from unprocessed ingredients seems rare and beautiful–an achievement only outshined by giving birth to my daughters. Perhaps these periodic Martha Stewart impulses stimulate the same endorphins as finishing a Jillian Anderson work-out. No doubt such research would be easier if I actually completed both tasks the same day. Someone should really write a grant for this.

While I’m prone to rhapsodizing about food, I haven’t yet decided whether I am a “foodie.” No doubt a Buzzfeed quiz would be happy to impose their assessment on me, but I prefer self-evaluation. I finally settled on these standards of measure:

1) Preoccupation with exotic ingredients (saffron-infused oil? organic double matcha?) only available at a store at least thirty minutes from one’s home. Extra points if the store doesn’t sell Spam or cigarettes.

2) Possession of a sufficiently large cookbook collection to qualify one for a TV spot on “Hoarders” or similar. (and an equally colossal array of online recipes)

3) A marked preference for novels in which the main character’s favorite recipes are featured. Extra credit if recipes are listed at the back of the book. (or if the main character is a caterer)

4) Willingness and/or compulsion to make homemade (and probably organic) versions of common kitchen staples, such as ketchup or peanut butter.

And finally:

5) Frequent snapping of food selfies while fantasizing about becoming a restaurant critic. (being paid to eat–Lord have mercy!)

A score of two indicates developing foodie tendencies. Three or more positive responses correlate strongly with foodie-ness. Implications of scores of four and five should be obvious. My score fluctuates between two and a half and four, depending the amount of time until Christmas is due to arrive. No, I can’t explain the two and a half.

As I sat polishing my book The Reluctant Archivist, I noticed foodie-ness creeping in. Interesting food sightings pepper the narrative, which I’m now confident will enhance the plot. In fact, I think it’s time to embrace the food plot device–maybe even feature a recipe or two. Even if Mill Fairbairn, main character and earnest politician, is far from a chef.

Do you read about food? What does it mean to you?

Quench your thirst for meaning–read.

 

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Filed under e-book, food, Uncategorized

Free E-Book Samples

Dear Reader,

I am offering samples of my flash-fiction (very short stories) e-books in exchange for your email address and a posted comment about them. First choice: “Life Bubbling Over,” which chronicles people’s mishaps when life gets in the way of their goals–lofty, and…less so.

The other collection, “Adventures in the Land of Confusion”, finds Gramma Loretta, retired teacher coping with Alzheimer’s disease, living life to the fullest in spite of it all!

Just contact me at juliehadler.com to get your copy! Not expiring soon, no black-out periods.

Keep following! Future sketches and samples are coming soon to acquaint you with my new characters.

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