New E-Book Release!

 

the-fanboy-who-fled-cover

Thirteen year-old David has quit soccer—he much prefers solving Sudoku puzzles. But when his parents divorce, David must endure the indignity of reporting to Miss Lee, the elderly Chinese-American neighbor Mom enlists to keep tabs on him.

David resents the intrusion, but when he and Miss Lee discover a common interest in word games, a true friendship develops. In fact, Miss Lee understands David better than Dad, who pressures David to participate in sports and insists he complete a project required for application to a prestigious private school. When Dad learns of his friendship with Miss Lee, his prejudiced nature shows itself. But does David care enough about what Dad wants for him to abandon a good friend?

As Miss Lee begins to help David with his application project, she wonders what consequences this will have for David. How will Miss Lee straddle the fine line between mentor, and meddler?

 

Available now for $.99 through Amazon, Kobo, Scribd, iBooks, Page Foundry, Tolino, and 24 Symbols.

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under e-book

The Reluctant Archivist

julies pics

Mill hugs Rich, John, and Melissa as confetti drifts down in his small, bustling campaign headquarters office.

“Thank you for all your hard work,” he bellows. The forty-some “Champaign Crusaders” clap and whistle. He is now a city councilman. The Goal—becoming mayor of Champaign IL, is now within reach.

But Mill’s conniving political rivals are using his brother Gary’s mental instability to discredit him, and not even Mill’s political savvy prevents a threat on Gary’s life. How will Mill maintain his focus on The Goal, when his own vulnerability to mental illness is already sabotaging his dream?

Mill escapes to graduate school, but ignoring his inner conflicts and “Gary challenges” isn’t making them go away. Then his former campaign manager, Rich, discovers some apparent dirty dealing in the Champaign Mayor’s office. Could this be the information Mill needs to get back on track and achieve the Goal?

Send Me My Free Book! 

See also books2read.com/u/mqzZr6  for all my published books!

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

First Chapter Sneak Peek

Chapter 1

No one in Ohni’s agency had as many case files on their desk. Okay, it wasn’t her agency. She didn’t own it or even manage it; though she might have done a better job than her current supervisor, a fiftyish bureaucrat in love with policy and procedure.

New Start Family Services of Saint Francis, Kansas, had never been fully funded, as some of social services providing help for more “worthy” clientele such as those coping with AIDS or heroin addiction. The dented file cabinets and outdated desktop computers showed it.

Ohni sighed and looked at the schedule on her day planner. Ten clients today. She gazed at the grey canvas covering her cubicle. It reflected her mood.

No lunch for me today, I guess,” she spoke towards the identical cubicle opposite her.

Oh, Ohni, you just need to be more efficient,” a faceless voice attached to a blonde head nagged. “Skip the depression assessment. Fill everything out while they’re talking.”

Ohni rolled her eyes.

They hardly ever make eye contact anyhow,” her office mate claimed.

Her cubicle opening filled with a slight but formidable frame that became only more threatening with continued acquaintance.

Budget meeting tonight, Ohni. You know the routine. Don’t forget to be back from supper break by five-thirty—it’s especially important we be prompt.” The middle-aged woman planted a hand on her hips and glared at Ohni.

Can I go to the cafe for supper?” Ohni struggled to push herself past a whisper. And failed.

You won’t have time. If needed, I’m sure the office refrigerator will yield something edible,” her supervisor intoned, as if speaking to a high school intern.

Ohni dreaded the meetings as much as agoraphobics fear track and field meets. Lasting til nine o’clock was common, and tonight’s agenda would be unusually tedious with Mr. Lanscombe making his quarterly appearance. The agency controller never met an illegible spreadsheet he didn’t like.

Her supervisor had vacated the doorway in the few seconds these thoughts ran through Ohni’s mind. She often thought her private musings to be the only things her supervisor couldn’t control. When she signed on with New Start, she had hoped the name would apply to her life as well. But her current situation, with little free time and an impossible quota of clients to serve, mocked her optimism like a spectre brandishing her work contract and ridiculing “you forgot to read the fine print Ohni! You will pay for your carelessness!”

Hey, Ohni, earth to Ohni…”

She snapped back to 2025.

Yeah, what, Rozika?”

I was only going to say I brought an extra sandwich today in case you didn’t have anything for supper.”

Thanks, Rozi. Tofurky?”

Yeah, mayo–no mustard. I remembered.”

Ohni wished Rozika would have better recall about her promise to speak to her Uncle Ulrich, attorney-at-law, about Ohni’s indenture contract. She’d misplaced the priceless piece of paper on her journey to St. Francis after her mother died. Seventeen years old and grieving, Ohni recalled. And the state of Kansas expects me to have all my ducks in a row when they dump me, all alone in St. Francis, in a crummy studio apartment?

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

If you couldn’t find it on Amazon, it is now there. Honest.

 

 

1991. Jonah knelt before the gravestone to pray. He placed his palm on the cold smooth surface, as if bestowing a blessing on his father’s head. Rev. Edward Tyson, 1929-1983.

Dear Lord, please forgive me.

The edges of the stone began to blur. He blinked and squinted at the writing. The engraving was melting, a videotape rewinding. In its place stood a long-haired teenager.

“So are you joining the party, or just going to stand there?” A classmate from his 1975 algebra class said.

In 1981, Jonah interviewed for admission to the seminary, but ten years later he’s settled for a job as a nonprofit administrator. Then a bizarre experience at Hemingway Cemetery makes him question where God’s will ends and his will begins. Can he dare to pursue his mission again?

 

Available through Apple iBooks, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Tolino, Inktera, Scribd, Playster, Kobo Plus, and 24 Symbols. 

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

New Release: Only 99c!

 

1991. Jonah knelt before the gravestone to pray. He placed his palm on the cold smooth surface, as if bestowing a blessing on his father’s head. Rev. Edward Tyson, 1929-1983.

Dear Lord, please forgive me.

The edges of the stone began to blur. He blinked and squinted at the writing. The engraving was melting, a videotape rewinding. In its place stood a long-haired teenager.

“So are you joining the party, or just going to stand there?” A classmate from his 1975 algebra class said.

In 1981, Jonah interviewed for admission to the seminary, but ten years later he’s settled for a job as a nonprofit administrator. Then a bizarre experience at Hemingway Cemetery makes him question where God’s will ends and his will begins. Can he dare to pursue his mission again?

 

Available through Apple iBooks, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Tolino, Inktera, Scribd, Playster, Kobo Plus, and 24 Symbols. 

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

The Reluctant Archivist

julies pics

Mill hugs Rich, John, and Melissa as confetti drifts down in his small, bustling campaign headquarters office.

“Thank you for all your hard work,” he bellows. The forty-some “Champaign Crusaders” clap and whistle. He is now a city councilman. The Goal—becoming mayor of Champaign IL, is now within reach.

But Mill’s conniving political rivals are using his brother Gary’s mental instability to discredit him, and not even Mill’s political savvy prevents a threat on Gary’s life. How will Mill maintain his focus on The Goal, when his own vulnerability to mental illness is already sabotaging his dream?

Mill escapes to graduate school, but ignoring his inner conflicts and “Gary challenges” isn’t making them go away. Then his former campaign manager, Rich, discovers some apparent dirty dealing in the Champaign Mayor’s office. Could this be the information Mill needs to get back on track and achieve the Goal?

Send Me My Free Book! 

See also books2read.com/u/mqzZr6  for all my published books!

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

New E-Book Release!

 

the-fanboy-who-fled-cover

Thirteen year-old David has quit soccer—he much prefers solving Sudoku puzzles. But when his parents divorce, David must endure the indignity of reporting to Miss Lee, the elderly Chinese-American neighbor Mom enlists to keep tabs on him.

David resents the intrusion, but when he and Miss Lee discover a common interest in word games, a true friendship develops. In fact, Miss Lee understands David better than Dad, who pressures David to participate in sports and insists he complete a project required for application to a prestigious private school. When Dad learns of his friendship with Miss Lee, his prejudiced nature shows itself. But does David care enough about what Dad wants for him to abandon a good friend?

As Miss Lee begins to help David with his application project, she wonders what consequences this will have for David. How will Miss Lee straddle the fine line between mentor, and meddler?

 

Available now for $.99 through Amazon, Kobo, Scribd, iBooks, Page Foundry, Tolino, and 24 Symbols.

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under e-book

Writing Fiction for Foodies (repost)

Branson-20140622-00002
I have a love-hate relationship with cooking. The responsibility of putting something not only edible but healthy on the table wars with my longing to put up my feet at day’s end. But the sense of accomplishment I savor when dishing up a casserole made from unprocessed ingredients seems rare and beautiful–an achievement only outshined by giving birth to my daughters. Perhaps these periodic Martha Stewart impulses stimulate the same endorphins as finishing a Jillian Anderson work-out. No doubt such research would be easier if I actually completed both tasks the same day. Someone should really write a grant for this.

While I’m prone to rhapsodizing about food, I haven’t yet decided whether I am a “foodie.” No doubt a Buzzfeed quiz would be happy to impose their assessment on me, but I prefer self-evaluation. I finally settled on these standards of measure:

1) Preoccupation with exotic ingredients (saffron-infused oil? organic double matcha?) only available at a store at least thirty minutes from one’s home. Extra points if the store doesn’t sell Spam or cigarettes.

2) Possession of a sufficiently large cookbook collection to qualify one for a TV spot on “Hoarders” or similar. (and an equally colossal array of online recipes)

3) A marked preference for novels in which the main character’s favorite recipes are featured. Extra credit if recipes are listed at the back of the book. (or if the main character is a caterer)

4) Willingness and/or compulsion to make homemade (and probably organic) versions of common kitchen staples, such as ketchup or peanut butter.

And finally:

5) Frequent snapping of food selfies while fantasizing about becoming a restaurant critic. (being paid to eat–Lord have mercy!)

A score of two indicates developing foodie tendencies. Three or more positive responses correlate strongly with foodie-ness. Implications of scores of four and five should be obvious. My score fluctuates between two and a half and four, depending the amount of time until Christmas is due to arrive. No, I can’t explain the two and a half.

As I sat polishing my book The Reluctant Archivist, I noticed foodie-ness creeping in. Interesting food sightings pepper the narrative, which I’m now confident will enhance the plot. In fact, I think it’s time to embrace the food plot device–maybe even feature a recipe or two. Even if Mill Fairbairn, main character and earnest politician, is far from a chef.

Do you read about food? What does it mean to you?

Quench your thirst for meaning–read.

Leave a Comment

Filed under e-book, Fiction, food

Nurse Cynthia’s Lime-Pear Gelatin Salad

3574824021_0943c70794_m

http://www.joyofjello.com/

I can remember this modest dish at our table several times, as well as presenting itself at various church pot-luck dinners. The idea is simple: make two large box of lime jello in a 9×13 glass casserole dish. Refrigerate until the jello starts to set, about a half an hour. Finally, add canned or fresh pear halves to the jello, leaving a least an inch of space between them, and chill for at least another hour until well set. Cut into squares, one pear-half per person. If you’d like to dress it up, spread the top with a mixture of equal parts prepared whipped cream and sour cream, and sprinkle with chopped walnuts. It’s here to stay.

 

I can just imagine troubled but intrepid character Gary, compelled to spend several weeks attending an inpatient mental health program, eating more than his fill of Jell-O. He might even protest my including the recipe in The Reluctant Archivist, considering the close association with hospital food. But his complaints would probably be to no avail. Lime-pear gelatin is now a staple, including the ready-made Jell-O brand cups. What 70’s foods do you wish would have gone out of style with platform shoes? Let me know at juliehadler.com.

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under food

What’s An Archivist, Anyhow?

So my character Mill is, among other things, an archivist? What in the heck is an archivist, and why would an aspiring politician want to be one?

People arjulies picse more familiar with the term archives, which brings to mind dusty records piling up in some kind of library, maybe consulted by a TV detective for evidence. Actually, many lovers of history, writing, and the ethical tightrope we call “politics” are users of or workers in archives. Archives are a treasure trove for biographical or historical researchers. They contain primary sources–that is,  narrative written by or directly quoted from the historical figure or event of interest. Eyewitness, on-the-scene descriptions. Any organization can maintain an archives, but large institutions such as universities, museums, city halls,  and presidential libraries are typical places to find them.

Can you imagine the millions of pieces information collected in one museum’s archives alone? Newspaper articles, letters, ledger en3111852354_240ee7ca74_mtries, meeting agendas, official memos–maybe even top-secret! No wonder a trained staff of archivists is needed to read, organize, catalog, and protect them.  Not to mention assisting researchers to find what they’re looking for. In the past, original copies were stored in special archival containers to protect them from the ravages of light, water, and time.  In our time, many collections have been converted into digital copies for safekeeping.

Safekeeping the past, so that we aren’t doomed to repeat its mistakes. Learning of fascinating events  from those who were there. These are some of the reasons Mill became an archivist. To find out the other reasons, you’ll have to read my book.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized